The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed


I started reading this book with no real expectations about it. And then IT BLEW MY MIND.

Synopsis (Goodreads): Who are the Nowhere Girls? They’re every girl. But they start with just three:

Grace Salter is the new girl in town, whose family was run out of their former community after her southern Baptist preacher mom turned into a radical liberal after falling off a horse and bumping her head.

Rosina Suarez is the queer punk girl in a conservative Mexican immigrant family, who dreams of a life playing music instead of babysitting her gaggle of cousins and waitressing at her uncle’s restaurant.

Erin Delillo is obsessed with two things: marine biology and Star Trek: The Next Generation, but they aren’t enough to distract her from her suspicion that she may in fact be an android.

When Grace learns that Lucy Moynihan, the former occupant of her new home, was run out of town for having accused the popular guys at school of gang rape, she’s incensed that Lucy never had justice. For their own personal reasons, Rosina and Erin feel equally deeply about Lucy’s tragedy, so they form an anonymous group of girls at Prescott High to resist the sexist culture at their school, which includes boycotting sex of any kind with the male students.

Review: This book is by far one of the most powerful stories I have ever read. It is a book that deals with so many different issues like rape and rape culture, sex positivity and choosing to be sexually active or not, sexual identity, ableism, racial discrimination, and biased school systems – and these are just a few!

The story is told mainly from the perspective of 3 girls: Grace, Rosina, and Erin. But there are also sections of the story called “Us” and they are from the perspective of various female characters in the book, that remain unnamed. I absolutely loved this approach. Not only did the author give us central characters to focus on and form connections with, she was also able to showcase various other perspectives. By creating anonymity through these voiceless other girls, she allowed other readers to put themselves in their place. It worked for me on so many levels, and gave me the chance to see so many different outlooks on various topics.

The main characters themselves were perfect choices for the story. Grace comes from a religious background, what with her mother being a pastor, and her views were about how her faith influences her choices. I really loved this angle and the way that the author developed Grace; she doesn’t blindly accept beliefs but tries to question them and analyze them so that they are relevant to her current life. These are things that I try to do daily with regards to my own religious views, and it was heartening to see an open-minded and faith-oriented character. I also loved that Grace, while being considered “fat”, never focused on her body issues. Her body did not become the main focal point, and that gave room for the reader to focus on her personality and thoughts.

Rosina comes from an immigrant family and struggles with her sexual orientation. Her worries that her mother will not accept that Rosina has feelings for women is a concern that I think many teens can face. Through her character, we get a glimpse of what it feels like to be marginalized, not only for your sexual preference but also for your race and immigration status.

Erin has Asperger’s Syndrome and her character deals with the struggles that come with being labelled. She has feelings, she has thoughts, and she wants to be able to show that Asperger’s in no ways limits her as a person. I loved how defiant she was about this label, how strongly she would say that this is a part of her that she would never change. There are plenty of times when someone says “I’m so sorry” when they hear about a child who has autism or Asperger’s and it bothers me a lot, because there is nothing to be sorry about. This person is still a person, who has wonderful gifts to offer the world, just like every other human being. Erin embodies this sentiment, and her experiences show that she is just like everyone else – and deserves to be treated that way.

I don’t want to speak too much since I don’t want to ruin this story, but it is an absolutely stunning read. Amy Reed is not afraid to pack the punches and this book has so many of them. I think that everything that this novel covers is relevant to people today – not just girls – and I would want everyone to read this. It’s a near perfect book for me, and I’m giving this a 5/5 stars.

Happy reading ~


My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent

I have a penchant for finding disturbing stories. Most of the time, I love the stories despite their gruesome nature. I like the different perspectives that these novels give me about what it means to survive, and how a person can be affected by trauma. It’s also interesting to see how cruel or twisted someone can be. I picked up this book hoping to get a glimpse of all of these things. Unfortunately, I did not. Here is my review:

Synopsis (Goodreads): Turtle Alveston is a survivor. At fourteen, she roams the woods along the northern California coast. The creeks, tide pools, and rocky islands are her haunts and her hiding grounds, and she is known to wander for miles. But while her physical world is expansive, her personal one is small and treacherous: Turtle has grown up isolated since the death of her mother, in the thrall of her tortured and charismatic father, Martin. Her social existence is confined to the middle school (where she fends off the interest of anyone, student or teacher, who might penetrate her shell) and to her life with her father.

Then Turtle meets Jacob, a high-school boy who tells jokes, lives in a big clean house, and looks at Turtle as if she is the sunrise. And for the first time, the larger world begins to come into focus: her life with Martin is neither safe nor sustainable. Motivated by her first experience with real friendship and a teenage crush, Turtle starts to imagine escape, using the very survival skills her father devoted himself to teaching her. The reader tracks Turtle’s escalating acts of physical and emotional courage, and watches, heart in throat, as she struggles to become her own hero–and in the process, becomes ours as well.

Review: Stephen King said this novel was a masterpiece. After reading it, I find myself struggling to see why. I feel like I am one of the few people who did not like this novel but I simply can’t understand what was so great about it.

First of all, the writing was just terrible. There are so many minute details given about every little thing. The conversations, however, are the first. I have yet to meet a single human being talk like that. I am in the world of academia, and not a single professor has ever talked to me the way that Martin, Turtle’s father, talks. I just couldn’t handle the philosophical rants that seemed to never end and were about the same issue. I hated almost all of Turtle’s conversations were just repetitions of curse words; I get it, she hears it all around her, but what is with the obsession of saying c_nt all the time?! It made her seem so much more simplistic than she really was. I was even more bothered when Turtle met the two teenage boys because their conversations and interactions were so unrealistic. It made me wonder if the author had ever actually met teenagers before. First of all, they don’t just talk about aliens all the time or act as if the girl in front of them doesn’t exist. Second of all, they don’t say “dude” and “sick” every minute.

This novel was presented to be a story about how Turtle deals with the abuse she receives from her father and how she survives and finds herself. But as I read, it just felt like the author was trying to exploit the abuse factor. There was no careful handling of the subject matter. It was very crass, and while I can handle difficult topics like sexual abuse and incest, that doesn’t mean it should be handled so indelicately. It left a bad taste in my mouth.

Maybe there was some magnificence to this novel. But the bad dialogue, bad characterization, and careless handling of a serious and sensitive topic made it hard for me to see the good in it. I’m giving this a 1/5 stars.

Happy reading ~

Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughan

Thank you to NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for my honest review.

Synopsis (Goodreads): Sophie’s husband James is a loving father, a handsome man, a charismatic and successful public figure. And yet he stands accused of a terrible crime. Sophie is convinced he is innocent and desperate to protect her precious family from the lies that threaten to rip them apart.

Kate is the lawyer hired to prosecute the case: an experienced professional who knows that the law is all about winning the argument. And yet Kate seeks the truth at all times. She is certain James is guilty and is determined he will pay for his crimes.

Who is right about James? Sophie or Kate? And is either of them informed by anything more than instinct and personal experience? Despite her privileged upbringing, Sophie is well aware that her beautiful life is not inviolable. She has known it since she and James were first lovers, at Oxford, and she witnessed how easily pleasure could tip into tragedy.

Review:  This is a story that could literally be about some of the scandalous news items we hear about everyday: a married politician or man in power who has an affair, and is then accused of rape. The story revolves around Kate, the prosecutor who is convinced that James is guilty of this crime, and Sophie, the wife who refuses to believe that her loving husband could do something like this.

This is not really a thriller, in terms of pacing or plot. There is no real thrill. Yes, the reader wants to know if James was actually guilty or not. But the story is about more than just that. It is about the abuse of power that we see happening around us all the time. It is about privilege and whether that allows someone to be exempt from facing the consequences of their transgressions. And it is about the people who are affected by one person’s selfishness.

I’m really glad that the story did not focus on James’s character. Apart from a few excerpts that are flashbacks to another incident in the past, James doesn’t really get a voice. Kate and Sophie are the alternating narrators of this story, and they each have their unique struggles with this case. I really liked that the author used this method to tell the story because it shifted the focus to the people that mattered most; usually in stories like this, the novel is focused on the accused and tries to make the reader feel sympathy for them. The author does not do that here, and does not excuse James for his alleged behaviour at all. There was a lot of complexity behind the emotions that both of the women felt and I really connected with them. I could understand why they reacted the way they did. I preferred Kate’s character to Sophie’s because I generally like stronger, more powerful female roles, but both women were well developed.

The pacing of this novel is slow, and that is something that readers should be aware of. In trying to explore these different issues, there is less time for a fast-paced story. There was also more of a focus on the British law and government, so if you are not familiar with the way things work there, this might be a bit confusing to read. While the pacing made sense in terms of helping the author achieve her goals with this story, I would have preferred a more high-intensity story.

To sum it all up, this was a very close examination of the effects that a high-profile affair and rape charge can have on people. I thought the author did a really great job of considering factors like preferential treatment, justice, consent, and privilege – all of which are factors in real-life cases like these. I thought that the pacing was a bit slow and perhaps, not all of the details were needed. But it was a good read and I am happy to give it a 3.5/5 stars! I will definitely be keeping an eye out for this author!

Happy reading ~

Odd Child Out by Gilly MacMillan

I was a little hesitant to read this novel because I hadn’t enjoyed The Perfect Girl. However, let it never be said that I am prejudiced against an author or their work; I always try to read at least one more book by that author to see whether I can gel with the author’s storytelling style. I was also intrigued because this book has been doing very well and was recommended to me by a bunch of different people. Here is my review:

Synopsis (Goodreads): Best friends Noah Sandler and Abdi Mahad have always been inseparable.  But when Noah is found floating unconscious in Bristol’s Feeder Canal, Abdi can’t–or won’t–tell anyone what happened.

Just back from a mandatory leave following his last case, Detective Jim Clemo is now assigned to look into this unfortunate accident.  But tragedy strikes and what looked like the simple case of a prank gone wrong soon ignites into a public battle.  Noah is British.  Abdi is a Somali refugee.   And social tensions have been rising rapidly in Bristol.  Against this background of fear and fury two families fight for their sons and for the truth.  Neither of them know how far they will have to go, what demons they will have to face, what pain they will have to suffer.

Because the truth hurts.

My review: At first, I struggled with the novel. The story was slow-going in the beginning, even though it takes place after the accident. I didn’t really know where the author wanted to take the story and quite a lot of time was taken to set the stage. While it didn’t make sense then, it certainly does now.

There were quite a few perspectives that this story was written from but one main one was that of Jim Clemo, the detective in charge of the investigation. Apart from his character, we also get to read from Noah’s perspective, Abdi’s family’s perspective, and finally, from Abdi himself. I thought this was a very interesting way to write the story, especially since there was no real order to the rotation of the different voices. I had my favourite voices, of course, but my actual opinion on this technique is split. On the one hand, it allowed me to see the situation from different eyes. However, I also didn’t always feel like I got to understand the characters themselves. It was definitely a unique way to present the story, and in the end, it did work.

I liked most of the characters in the story, regardless of whether their role was positive or negative. However, the one character I really didn’t care for was Jim Clemo. I didn’t think there was much of a personality, and I didn’t really want to learn too much about his side story.

The main story itself was a lot more complex than how it was first portrayed. This isn’t just about culpability and who did what. This was about the struggle to be an immigrant, the struggle of being a part of the life of a sick child. There were issues with the media and the way that it can warp the findings of a case. This novel even showed some insight into the way trauma and PTSD can affect a person’s life in the long-term. Even though I wasn’t able to get into the novel in the beginning, the complexity and depth of all of these issues quickly made me change my mind and I found myself appreciative of the effort the author put into talking about these different topics. By the end of the novel, I was hooked and I found the ending to surpass all my expectations. This novel gets a solid 4/5 stars from me!

Happy reading ~

Rage Against the Dying by Becky Masterman – Brigid Quinn #1

I am usually loathe to start a new series, especially when I have so many incomplete ones. But something about this book was too appealing for me to pass up on. After reading it, I’m so glad I gave it a shot! Here is my review:

In her prime, Brigid Quinn not only worked serial killer cases as an FBI agent, but also served as bait. Small and blond, she had the vulnerable look down pat – and she used it to catch dangerous killers. But as Quinn got older, she realized that she needed a younger field agent to take her place. So Quinn trains a 22-year-old and puts her out in the field. The plan should have worked – if not for the Route 66 killer, who not only took the bait, but killed her, too. Years later, Quinn is still haunted by the decisions she made and the role she played in the young woman’s death. When she gets a knock on her door telling her the girl’s body has finally been found, Quinn is pulled back into the case. The FBI is in high spirits: not only did they find the girl’s body, but they also apprehended the killer. But the more Brigid learns about the case, the more she comes to believe that they have the wrong man. The killer might still be out there … and the only one who knows it is Brigid.

Right off the bat, I have to say: this book was awesome. There were so many things that were done right in this story and with each page, I became more and more engrossed in the story!

Brigid is one of the most unique protagonists I’ve come across in a crime series.  First of all, she is 59 years old. Most of the crime novels feature protagonists who are not older than 40 (and that’s the maximum) and the main character is someone who is not always the most experienced person. In this case, Brigid is well-known for her work as an FBI agent and has since retired. I love that Brigid is a no-nonsense character who has a sharp tongue that she isn’t afraid to wield. She has insecurities that haunt her and influence her decisions. And she has a very dry sense of humor. I enjoyed reading through her eyes and seeing her put together the pieces of the puzzle.

I also really liked the way the author wrote the story. Writing it from the first perspective allowed for an even greater connection with Brigid’s character and it made it clear that this story, while dealing with a serious crime, was all about Brigid. And that is perfectly fine. It didn’t bother me that other characters didn’t stand out as much because Brigid was the star of the show. I found the conversations to be witty, and the detailing of events to be spot on. I really loved that the author wrote the story in a way that we were able to clearly follow Brigid’s train of thought and come to the same conclusions as her.

I also really liked the plot. I thought the story took interesting but believable turns, and tied things up quite nicely. It also wasn’t too procedural, which is often the case with crime novels. There was enough suspense to keep me guessing, and I like the slower release of backstory information that took place.

My overall impression of this book was that it was really well written. The writing was strong, the plot was strong, and the main character was phenomenal. I would definitely recommend this to anyone who likes crime novels and unique characters, and I will definitely be reading more books from this series! 5/5 stars from me!

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

When I read The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins, I wasn’t blown away. However, I chalked up my feelings to the fact that I had just recently read Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn and was comparing every thriller to that one. So when I heard that Hawkins had released another thriller, I thought that this one would give me a better idea of whether I liked her or not, especially since my last read wasn’t a thriller. Here is my review:

In the last days before her death, Nel called her sister. Jules didn’t pick up the phone, ignoring her plea for help. Now, Nell is dead, having jumped off a cliff. And Jules has to go back home to care for Nell’s teenage daughter. But Jules is afraid. Of her long-buried memories, of the old Mill House, of knowing that Nel would never have jumped. And most of all she’s afraid of the water, and the place they call the Drowning Pool…

I’ll be straight with you: I didn’t like this novel. There were a lot of things that didn’t work for me, and it was really hard for me to push through and get to the end. One of the things that I really didn’t like about this novel is that there were too many characters involved. Every chapter was told from some character’s perspective, which is a literary structure I usually like. But when there are more than 5 characters who all have a voice? Well, it can be really hard to keep it all together. And while it became clear why the author did this when I got to the end of the novel, I still thought it wasn’t the right way to go about telling this story. It was also misleading because the premise, as advertised, seemed to only talk about Jules and so there is this assumption that the story will mostly feature her – but that wasn’t true. I also thought that the story took a long time to get to the point. The first half just dragged on and on, and it really wasn’t relevant for setting the stage because I promptly forgot about the minuscule details that connected different individuals together. This was definitely a quiet thriller, without a lot of the drama and high intensity scenes that are popular in other books in this genre. It reminded me a bit of Midsomer Murders, which is a show I really enjoy watching because of its detailed but slower pacing. However, this novel was missing some spark to really make it interesting and the overwhelming amount of character perspectives definitely bogged the story down. And by the time I finished the novel, I really didn’t think that it was worth all that effort. For those reasons, I’m giving this a 1/5 stars.

Happy reading ~


Two Girls Down by Louisa Luna

Thank you to Penguin Random House and the First to Read program for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

When I heard about this book, I thought it would be just another thriller. I was so wrong! This thriller had me hooked and it was by far a favorite of mine, and a great way to close off the year! I can’t wait for you all to get a chance to read it in January! But for now, here is my review:

When 2 young sisters disappear from a strip mall parking lot in Pennsylvania, a bounty hunter by the name Alice Vega is hired to find the girls. Immediately shut out by a local police department, Vega enlists the help of a disgraced former cop, Max Caplan. Cap is a man trying to put the scandal of his past behind him and move on, but Vega needs his help to find the girls, and she will not be denied. With little to go on, Vega and Cap will go to extraordinary lengths to untangle a dangerous web of lies, false leads, and complex relationships to find the girls before time runs out, and they are gone forever.

This novel was definitely a success for me and I think this was mostly due to the character of Vega. She was such an interesting and unique character and she got me interested in the story. Vega is a woman who doesn’t express too many emotions, who is all about the case, and who does things in a badass way. I loved her dark and badass personality – it reminded me a lot of Lisbeth Salander from the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series. I really liked the way she interacted with Cap, who was another terrific character. The one thing this novel had going for it were the characters. All of them were just so unique and intriguing and I could never tell who was guilty and who wasn’t. I also really liked the plot: it was engaging and full of twists and turns. I think there were some points that were a bit more complicated than they needed to be, and that made me lose my focus for a bit, but the author was able to draw me back in quickly enough. Overall, this was a great thriller that I couldn’t put down. It had great characters, and a very interesting plot. I can’t wait to read more by this author and I would recommend this novel for anyone who is a fan of thrillers! 4.5/5 stars from me!

Happy reading ~

I Found You by Lisa Jewell

The last time I read something by Lisa Jewell was 2 years ago, and I absolutely loved it. The book was The Girls in the Garden, and I found the thriller to be very engrossing. With that experience in mind, I was really excited to see how this novel would turn out! Here is my review: 

In a windswept British seaside town, single mom Alice Lake finds a man sitting on the beach outside her house. He has no name, no jacket, and no idea how he got there. Against her better judgment, she invites him inside. Meanwhile, in London, newly-wed Lily Monrose’s husband fails to come home from work one night. Stranded in a country where she knows no one, Lily goes to the police – only to find out that the man she calls husband never existed. 23 years ago, Gray and Kirsty were teenagers on holiday with their parents. But their annual trip to the seaside town takes a disturbing turn when an enigmatic young man starts to pay attention to Kirsty. As these 3 paths intertwine, lies will be told, hidden secrets will be revealed, and lives will be changed forever.

What I had loved about The Girls in the Garden was how character-driven the story was. This novel was also heavily character-driven, which would have been great … except I didn’t like the characters. Every single one of them is so needy and so unbelievable. For example, let’s take the character of Alice. Even if you consider yourself to be very outgoing and in the habit of making bad mistakes, why would you bring a random stranger into your house? Especially considering that you have children who live with you? Okay, say I believe that you want to be a nice and helpful person – why would you let them stay for longer than a day? In what planet does it not strike you to call the police and get them to help you? And why, oh why, would you start up a romance?! The sheer amount of Lily’s character, while being well developed, was one that I just didn’t like. The way she spoke and acted were not always synchronous with her emotions so I would sometimes feel confused by what she was thinking or feeling (especially nearer to the end when everything was revealed). I didn’t actually mind the missing guy’s character, nor did I mind the story line that takes place 23 years ago; in fact, those were the only 2 things I liked about the novel. By the time I got to the middle of the novel, I had pretty much figured everything out. Nearly all of my predictions came true (and I’m usually pretty bad at predicting things). I don’t actually mind that sometimes thrillers can be easy to predict – as long as the story is well-written and clearly resolved, I can still enjoy it. This was not the case here. When the final turn of events were occurring, it was a complete mess. All of the characters come together, and then some random journalist gets involved where she really didn’t have to, and nobody does anything logical. Not at all. Everything is revealed in such a way that it made me dislike the entire novel. I’m actually quite sad that I didn’t like this book more, especially since a lot of people gave it rave reviews. But the actions of certain characters, combined with an ending that was implausible and random were just too much for me. I’m giving this a 2/5 stars because I liked the storyline that took place in the past. But that’s the only positive from me.

Happy reading ~

The Power by Naomi Alderman

As soon as I read the premise for this novel, I knew I had to give it a go. This story was literally marketed as “perfect for a fan of Margaret Atwood” … and I am definitely a fan of Atwood’s work. Another thing I found out about this author and this book that made me interested in reading it is that Margaret Atwood was this author’s mentor and had really loved this novel. What better endorsement could I ask for? So I got myself a copy… and now, here is my review:

The world is a recognisable place: there’s a rich Nigerian kid who lounges around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But on a day like any other, something has happened, something that will cause the lives of these individuals to converge. Teenage girls have developed an immense physical power – they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

The concept for this novel is absolutely brilliant. I love the idea of girls and women having an incredible ability, lying dormant in their bodies until something causes it to just come alive. And this novel is really a testament for how it only takes one to cause a revolution. The story is told from alternating perspectives where each of the characters mentioned here (and maybe some others) get a chance to tell the story from their point of view. There is only one male voice that is a main character: the rich Nigerian boy, Tunde. All of the other characters are female and they all have their own unique personalities that really comes through when they get their moment in the spotlight. I’m going to tell you right now: the strange power that females in this novel have is the ability to produce and channel electricity inside of their bodies. With this power, they can kill or hurt or shock anyone. Now, women are more powerful than men and they are using it to their advantage. The whole story is about reimagining the world: what would it be like if women were now in control instead of men? How would that takeover happen and how successful would it be? And the author really takes the time to answer this question through a multitude of issues from terrorism to politics to religion. I really appreciated the time and effort that went into cementing this concept. But this wasn’t really a story. It was more of a documentary or a research paper if anything else. In fact, this novel was shaped as a book proposal being submitted by someone named Nell to Naomi Alderman for review, which I thought was interesting … but also just made it less of a story and more research-like. The novel doesn’t allow for a great deal of emotional connection with the characters, and the story dragged on after the initial high-intensity chapters. There were a lot of cliché moments in the novel that took away from the novelty of it all. I guess I just wanted more story at times, and less of an explanation of the political situation. Overall, this was a fascinating concept and I liked a lot of the things the author had to say; I just wish the delivery of it all had been more story-like and less like a documentary. I’m giving this a 3/5 stars but really, the points are mostly just for the concept and the first half of the novel.

Happy reading ~

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

I resisted for a long time before reading this novel. Why? Because it was getting super popular and it was getting televised, and I thought it was just all hype. It’s happened so many times where people get really excited about a book and then I read it with high expectations and get let down. Also, the story seemed to be a little on the fluff side, if you know what I mean, and I generally stay away from that. But I decided to get out of that mindset and give this novel a shot. I’m so glad I did.

When Madeline gets involved in something, she is a force to be reckoned with. She’s passionate and funny, and holds onto grudges. However, Madeline’s ex-husband and his hippie new wife have moved into Madeline’s beloved community – and their daughter is in the same kindergarten class as Madeline’s youngest. And to make matters worse, Madeline’s teenage daughter seems to be choosing Madeline’s ex-husband over her. How will she cope with all of this?!

Celeste is the kind of beautiful woman who makes the world stop and stare. She’s always flustered and in a dreamlike state … but who wouldn’t be with such active twin boys? Now that the boys are in school, Celeste and her husband seem to be the perfect fit as king and queen of the school parent body. However, royalty comes with a price, and Celeste doesn’t know if she can pay up.

Jane is a single mom who has just moved to this town. Sad beyond her years, she is harboring secret doubts about her son… but why? As Madeline and Celeste take Jane under their wing, none of them realizes how the arrival of Jane and her inscrutable little boy will affect them all.

After reading this novel, I cursed myself for waiting so long. It is such an amazing novel and I honestly don’t know where to start with this review.

First of all, I love the moms. They are so unique and amazing. They are funny, and have deep emotions and I was able to connect and understand each of them as they go through their individual struggles. I never felt like I liked one main character over the other; all 3 were equally important to me. I also loved the way they interacted with the other mothers and with their own children; it was such a realistic portrayal of how misunderstandings can bloom into full-out hatred. And both the creation and breakdown of relationships was described beautifully.

This novel was also beautifully written. I loved how there were moments in each chapter that read like a transcript from an interview. It kept me guessing as to what they were hinting at, and it also served to spice up the traditional writing style. I loved that the author spoke from multiple perspectives and managed to keep each one separate. There were perfect bursts of comedic relief thrown in during intense moments; this has got to be one of the only books that can intersperse humor in between serious scenes. And yet, the author still managed to highlight the importance of these issues; in no way did the humor take away from the seriousness of the situation at hand. I loved it.

Overall, this was just a fantastic novel. The characters were great, the plot was great, the relationships and interactions between characters was beautifully written, the pacing was on point, and the writing style itself was golden. I cannot recommend this book enough because I guarantee it will take your preconceived notions and make you chuck them out the window! If you have been a fool like me and not read this novel, go read it now! If you haven’t already guessed, I’m giving this a 5/5 stars!

Happy reading ~